Nutrition Facts About Oat Bran And Rolled Oats

Oats are healthy and benefit the body in many ways. Having oats regularly can help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and can help improve the immune system. They can also help control blood pressure and lower bad cholesterol in the blood. They are good sources of fiber and aid in digestion.

There are different types of oats. The most common types of oats include the following:1

  • Raw oats: These are newly harvested grains. They are not available in the stores as raw oats. This type of oats is the one before the kernels are separated from the hulls and stalks.
  • Whole oat groats: Groat is also known as grain kernel. These oat groats are the oats that are cleaned and separated from the inedible parts. These take the longest to cook.
  • Steel cut oats: These are also known as Irish oatmeal. When oat groats are cut with a metal blade, you get steel cut oats. These cook easier than the oat groats because water penetrates through the cut oats easily.
  • Scottish oatmeal: These oats are crushed and they appear as broken bits of varying sizes.
  • Rolled oats: Rolled oats are steamed and rolled into flakes. They are also known as old-fashioned oats. These oats cook faster.
  • Instant or quick rolled oats: These are thinner flakes than rolled oats. The texture is different from rolled oats.
  • Oat flour: This is a whole grain flour used in baking or thickening soups.

Oat bran is not a type of oats. It is the outside casing of the oat grain and can be very nutritious for the body. These may not be easily available like the other oat products, but you can purchase them from certain food stores.

Let’s examine the nutritional differences between oat bran and rolled oats.

Advertisements

Nutrition Facts About Oat Bran And Rolled Oats

Both oat bran and rolled oats benefit the body. They are good sources of fiber, B vitamins, minerals like calcium and potassium, and good fats. However, these nutrients are present in different quantities in oat bran and rolled oats.

1. Fiber

Oat Bran And Rolled Oats Are Rich In Fiber

Advertisements

Whole grains usually have a high content of dietary fiber. Oat bran, however, has more dietary fiber than rolled oats. A cup (approximately 100 g) of raw oat bran contains about 15 grams of fiber, whereas the same amount of rolled oats contains 10 grams.

The recommended daily intake of fiber for adult men is 30 grams and for women, 25 grams.2

Advertisements

Dietary fiber is essential for the proper functioning of the gut, improving digestion of food. A high intake of dietary fiber reduces the risk of developing coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and certain gastrointestinal diseases.

2. Proteins

Oat Bran And Rolled Oats Are Rich In Proteins

Advertisements

Oat bran and rolled oats are good sources of proteins as well. 100 grams of raw oat bran contains about 17 grams of proteins and the same amount of rolled oats contain 15 grams.

The recommended daily intake of proteins for adult men between 19 and 70 years is 64 grams and for women of the same age group, 46 grams. Men above 70 years require 81 grams and women of the same age require 57 grams of protein per day.3

Advertisements

Adequate protein intake can help increase muscle mass and strength, reduce late night snack cravings, boost metabolism, and is good for the bones.

3. Carbohydrates

Oat Bran And Rolled Oats Are Rich In Carbohydrates

Advertisements

Carbohydrates are the main sources of energy in the body. Oat bran and rolled oats have almost equal carbohydrate content. 100 grams of raw oat bran has 66 grams of carbohydrates whereas the same amount of rolled oats contain 62 grams.

Carbohydrates should constitute about 45–65 percent of the total calorie intake. Carbohydrate content required for men and women per day depends on their daily calorie intake. On an average, most women require 1600–2200 calories per day while men require 2200–2800 calories.

4. Fats

Oat Bran And Rolled Oats Are Rich In Good Fats

Oat bran and rolled oats contain good fats in moderate amounts. 100 grams of raw oat bran has about 7 grams of fat whereas the same amount of rolled oats contain 7.5 grams. They are low in the saturated fats that can be harmful to the body, lowering the risk of coronary heart diseases.

The American Heart Association suggests that 8–10 percent of daily calories should come from unsaturated or good fats and only 5–6 percent of the daily calories should come from saturated fats.4

5. Minerals

Oat Bran And Rolled Oats Are Rich In Minerals Like Iron

When it comes to mineral content, oat bran is a healthier choice when compared with rolled oats. Oat bran contains minerals that are required by the body including iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, and potassium.

100 grams of oat bran contains about 5 mg of iron and rolled oats contain 4.5 mg. Iron is important for transporting oxygen to the different parts of the body.

6. B Vitamins

Oat Bran And Rolled Oats Are Rich In B Vitamins

Oat bran is a good source of thiamin – 100 grams of oat bran contains 1.17 milligrams of thiamin. The prominent vitamin found in rolled oats is niacin. 100 grams of rolled oats contains 1.125 milligrams of niacin.

Thiamin is important for the body because it helps to improve the immune system and the body’s ability to withstand stressful conditions. Niacin, on the other hand, improves blood circulation and helps suppress inflammation in the body.

Packed with nutritional benefits, oats are perfect for your breakfast with fruits like berries.

References[+]