9 Lifestyle Changes To Make When You Turn 40

At 40, life can be pretty busy. You might be moving up in your career while the kids turn into adults. At the same time, your body is going through major age-related changes.

Everything calls for a different mindset. After all, you’re not 20 anymore! The possibility of chronic diseases is also much closer.

So treat your body well by adapting these 9 lifestyle habits for your 40s.

1. Increase Calcium Intake

Increase Calcium Intake
Increase Calcium Intake

Age-related bone loss usually begins at 40, but there’s still time to strengthen your bones. This is important for preventing fractures and osteoporosis, especially if you’re a woman.

Focus on getting enough calcium through diet or supplements. Aim for 1,000 mg each day, along with 1,000 IU vitamin D to help calcium absorption.1 Regular exercise will also keep your bones nice and strong.

2. Manage Stress

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Manage Stress

Too much stress can hurt your heart and lead to memory loss later in life.2 Even chronic diseases like depression and stomach ulcers have been linked to chronic stress.3

As you age, practice healthy ways of relieving stress. This can be anything from yoga, hiking, or socializing with friends.

3. Exercise Regularly

Exercise Regularly
Exercise Regularly

After age 30, you lose 3 to 8 percent of muscle mass per decade. This increases your risk of falls and other accidents.4

The normal aging process can also stiffen your arteries, making it harder for your heart to pump blood. Luckily, even a light

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exercise routine can slow down these changes and prevent chronic diseases.

4. Eat Fiber For Digestive Health

Eat Fiber For Digestive Health
Eat Fiber For Digestive Health

As you age, you’re more likely to have constipation and other digestive issues. Protect your gut by eating high-fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. This will encourage regular bowel movements and prevent future intestinal problems.5

Drinking enough water will also help by moving fiber through your body6

5. Stay Mentally Stimulated

Stay Mentally Stimulated
Stay Mentally Stimulated

While mild forgetfulness is a normal part of aging, dementia isn’t. This type of mental decline usually shows up after 65 years of age.7

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But since it happens gradually, you have the chance to slow it down.

Keep your brain active by reading or joining a club. Anything that challenges your brain will strengthen your nerve cells, decreasing your risk of mental decline.8

6. Take Care Of Your Eyes

Take Care Of Your Eyes
Take Care Of Your Eyes

Vision problems usually start in the early 40s.9 In fact, over 1.75 million Americans over the age of 40 suffer from eye damage known as age-related macular degeneration.10

Take care of your eyes by limiting screen time and using proper lighting. You can also protect your eyes from the sun’s harsh rays with sunglasses and wide brim hats.11

7. Stay Hydrated

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Stay Hydrated

Aging naturally causes changes in sodium and water balance. This places older people at risk of dehydration, causing confusion and irritability.12

But staying hydrated is also important for keeping aging skin healthy. It can relieve constipation, which is a common issue in older people. Men should aim for 13 cups of fluid each day. Women should go for 9. Keep it healthy by choosing water over sugary drinks.13

8. Improve Immunity

Improve Immunity
Improve Immunity

Age-related oxidative stress can hurt your immune cells, making it harder to fight

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disease. But you can strengthen your immunity by fueling up on antioxidants like vitamins A and C.14 These can be found in fresh fruits like oranges and veggies like broccoli.

Since your gut is your first line of defense, it might also help to have probiotics. This will keep your gut bacteria balanced and promote good digestion.15

9. Maintain Healthy Weight

Maintain Healthy Weight
Maintain Healthy Weight

A healthy weight can ward off chronic diseases such as osteoporosis. It can even prevent urinary incontinence, a common consequence of aging.

About 40 percent of adults aged 40 to 74 are also pre-diabetic, increasing the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But a healthy weight can prevent these illnesses from completely

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developing.16

You can’t stop yourself from aging. But you can definitely change how your body handles it. If you’re trying to adopt a new lifestyle change, start small and work up from there. Remember, it’s never too late!

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