Are Frozen And Canned Vegetables/Fruits As Nutritious As Fresh Ones?

Are Frozen And Canned Vegetables/Fruits As Nutritious As Fresh Ones?
Are Frozen And Canned Vegetables/Fruits As Nutritious As Fresh Ones?

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Curejoy Expert Janardhana Hebbar Explains:

It is estimated that much of the food consumed in the United States travels an average of 1500 miles from the farm to your kitchen table. This is both an economic and environmental concern; at this rate, depletion of fuel and local agricultural resources could occur in the near future. The alternative can simply be using frozen and canned vegetables which helps your health and is environmentally sustainable. Frozen produce is sent directly from the fields and orchards where it is grown to a processor near the field. After produce is frozen or canned, it is preserved and stored at the processor before distribution in a large bulk shipment. Perishable fresh produce, on the other hand, needs to get to its destination rapidly and is shipped in smaller quantities and great distances, especially during the off-season.

Although, fresh produce is shipped fast enough to prevent damage and spoilage, its nutritional value may suffer. In fact, loss of vitamins and minerals in fresh vegetables is perhaps more significant than originally thought, according

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to study findings by Joy Rickman and colleagues published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. The longer vegetables are in transition, the more nutrients are oxidized into the air. The average time frame from farm to your fork is about 10–14 days. In contrast, produce that is frozen and canned sits only a couple of hours before its freshness and nutrients are sealed in by the freezing or canning methods.

To have a healthy diet you must take into consideration that fresh fruits and vegetables are not going to be available year round and that you’re going to have to consider having canned or frozen vegetables when they’re not in season. Fresh fruits and vegetables don’t taste as good when they’re out of season and can typically be much more expensive. Canned, dehydrated, frozen are all very good options to consider for a complete, wholesome diet.

The benefits of consuming canned or frozen vegetables is that they are affordable even when they are out of season. There might be negligible loss of some vitamins due to the processing

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but for the most part you’re still going to benefit from the vitamins and minerals that are in processed foods. Sometimes the added sugar and salt in processed foods make it less nutritious. Hence, it’s recommended that you read the label and take a look at the amount of sodium and sugar levels in the foods.

Today many manufacturers are offering canned vegetables and beans that have no added salt or with reduced sodium with is a better option. You can also rinse your canned vegetables and beans with water to remove any added preservatives. While choosing canned fruits, remember that they are often canned in heavy sugar syrup, but, there are other option where you can consider purchasing something that is packed in water or its own juice. The same holds true for frozen products. You typically want to purchase those that do not contain any added sugars or salt.

Some people engage in home preservation which there is a renewed interest in today. In this technique, people during the times of year when there are a lot of fresh fruits

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and vegetables available at a low cost because they are in season or maybe they are growing some on their own, engage in canning or freezing them at home, so that they can enjoy them year round.  Typically, if they are canned at the peak of their freshness they’re going to taste better.

Another major concern about canned foods is the BPA. Today many states have passed laws requiring BPA be eliminated from products for infants or small children. Although, The FDA has said BPA is safe, research does indicate otherwise. If you are concerned about this, you can reduce BPA exposure by purchasing products in glass as opposed to those that in cans or plastic. You might want to use microwave safe ceramic or glass containers to heat foods.

In conclusion, either ways, it’s better to have canned/frozen vegetables than none at all. Many studies have indicated that frozen vegetables are as nutritious, if not more, than their fresh counterparts. Frozen vegetables/fruits are better than canned as there is some loss of nutrition for canned foods. But if you choose canned

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foods that have no added sodium or sugar then you can be sure that they can provide the same nutrition as fresh vegetables/fruits.